Defining Open Authority

An attempt to illustrate, define, & discuss the intersection between museum
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Posts tagged "Libraries"

2 years ago 64 notes Libraries tech

museumsandstuffReblogged from museumsandstuff

museumsandstuff:

New York Public Library’s Stereogranimator Lets You Make GIFs Out Of 19th Century Stereographs:

“With the Stereogranimator, the NYPL is letting users transform 19th century stereographs into GIFs, which lets people experience these historical images the way someone in the 1800s might have. Drawing on a collection of over 40,000 stereographs, the Stereogranimator is a project of the NYPL Labs, an experimental unit at the library using digital means to develop new tools for research.
“If you look through enough of them, you start to notice that many from before 1900 come in seemingly-identical pairs. What you may not realize is that these pairs were meant to be viewed together, each side lending the other a sense of depth that a photograph alone cannot possess,” Joshua Heineman, who began a version of the Stereogranimator as a personal project on his blog, wrote on the Huffington Post. “Using stereoscopes, the entertainment-seeking public of the 19th century immersed themselves in these 3D photographs (called stereographs) in a manner akin to how we now view movies, video games or cellphone screens.” 

Wow this is an amazing idea coming out of a GLAM I admire :). What a great way to make a historical hobby extremely fun and relevant for today? Love love love.

museumsandstuff:

New York Public Library’s Stereogranimator Lets You Make GIFs Out Of 19th Century Stereographs:

“With the Stereogranimator, the NYPL is letting users transform 19th century stereographs into GIFs, which lets people experience these historical images the way someone in the 1800s might have. Drawing on a collection of over 40,000 stereographs, the Stereogranimator is a project of the NYPL Labs, an experimental unit at the library using digital means to develop new tools for research.

“If you look through enough of them, you start to notice that many from before 1900 come in seemingly-identical pairs. What you may not realize is that these pairs were meant to be viewed together, each side lending the other a sense of depth that a photograph alone cannot possess,” Joshua Heineman, who began a version of the Stereogranimator as a personal project on his blog, wrote on the Huffington Post. “Using stereoscopes, the entertainment-seeking public of the 19th century immersed themselves in these 3D photographs (called stereographs) in a manner akin to how we now view movies, video games or cellphone screens.”

Wow this is an amazing idea coming out of a GLAM I admire :). What a great way to make a historical hobby extremely fun and relevant for today? Love love love.

(via museumsandstuff)

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3 years ago 14 notes Clayton Christensen David W. Lewis IUPUI Indianapolis Open Access libraries preprints museums museum professionals

museumstudiesReblogged from museumstudies

The Inevitability of Open Access - Preprint

museumstudies:

Open access (OA)”, writes David W. Lewis, Dean of the IUPUI University Library, Indianapolis, in this preprint (submitted on 11 September 2011, due for publication in July 2012), “is an alternative business model for the publication of scholarly journals. It makes articles freely available to readers on the Internet and covers the costs associated with publication through means other than subscriptions. This article argues that Gold OA, where all of the articles of a journal are available at the time of publication, is a disruptive innovation as defined by business theorist Clayton Christensen. Using methods described by Christensen we can predict the growth of Gold OA. This analysis suggests that Gold OA could account for 50% of the scholarly journal articles sometime between 2017 and 2021, and 90% of articles as soon as 2020 and more conservatively by 2025.”

The link is to the full .pdf text of this interesting essay. Museum people should read it, looking for analogies in their own field…

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